Joanne Ramos

Interview for Princeton’s “The Ivy Club“

“Don’t worry so much about having a plan. Don’t feel such pressure to know where you’re going.”
—Joanne Ramos

Read Joanne’s advice to her 18 year-old self and much more here! 

The Farm: Debut Novel Brings Filipina Story, Deeper Cultural Ideas To Life

If you haven’t read Joanne Ramos’ The Farm yet, you should.

Even though the novel is her debut work, it’s taking the literary world by storm. Verging on dystopian, The Farm imagines a world not too different from our own, where lower class, marginalized women sign away their wombs — and a year of their life — to serve the wealthy upper classes.

Cold Tea Collective had a chance to ask the Filipina-American writer about her book, and the life and ideas that inspired it.

Read the whole interview here!

“Just Say Thank You”– Joanne and Julianna Margulies on Owning Your Success

‘”So much of my life I have been self-deprecating,’ Ramos explains. ‘I almost took it as a way to be humble […] I would say, ‘oh the timing was great for it,’ or ‘oh but I really lucked out.’ Especially in the wake of all the praise The Farm was receiving, Ramos found herself constantly deflecting praise — and her family took notice.”

Read the whole article here!

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Aurora Rose/SheMedia/Shutterstock

Joanne Ramos Interview with Feminartsy

The Farm is an insightful and beautifully crafted novel that explores surrogacy, the intersection of wealth and privilege and the intimate lives of migrant women in America. It is eerily insightful into a not-so-distant future where the exploitation of women’s bodies will become even more normalised.

Read the full interview here!

JOANNE RAMOS INTERVIEW: ‘THE IDEAS IN MY BOOK HAD BEEN STEWING IN MY HEAD FOR DECADES’

Watch this space for “So Beautiful,” Joanne’s upcoming piece for Popshot Magazine!

Joanne Ramos on “Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books”

Joanne sat down with Zibby Owens to talk about Joanne’s debut novel, The Farm. You can listen to the whole episode here!

Joanne Ramos on Feminist Book Club: The Podcast

Listen to the full episode here (or find it on the streaming service of your choice)!

The Farm is a Cityline Book-Club Pick

The Canadian talk show Cityline chose The Farm as it’s June book-club pick! I absolutely loved speaking to the dynamic and beautiful Tracy Moore about the book, straddling worlds, and how most people are neither villains nor saints, but complex, conflicted beings.

The Farm on The Morning Show!

What fun speaking with Carolyn MacKenzie about The Farm on the popular Canadian morning TV show, The Morning Show!

Joanne’s interview in Marie Claire—and how she wants to make readers uncomfortable

Joanne is Marie Claire’s #ReadWithMC author of the month! Read her Q&A here!

“Motherhood is not even seen until it’s outsourced”-An Interview with The Guardian

“At the heart of surrogacy lie questions about choice and power, but Ramos says she has nothing against it. ‘I guess I would question how far we’ve pushed so many things into the realm of markets. I just wonder what that does to our relationships.’ When value is conflated with price, as happens so often in our society, things get warped, she says: ‘Certain things which are unpaid, like motherhood, are not even seen until they’re outsourced. Does surrogacy make people value pregnancy more … or does it diminish it because it’s just another thing to buy?'” Read the rest of the interview here!

The Farm is a Cityline Book-Club Pick

The Canadian talk show Cityline chose The Farm as it’s June book-club pick! I absolutely loved speaking to the dynamic and beautiful Tracy Moore about the book, straddling worlds, and how most people are neither villains nor saints, but complex, conflicted beings.

EMC’s Interview with Author Joanne Ramos from THE FARM

Almost all the women in THE FARM are mothers, and yet the mothers in the book cross lines of class and race. Please discuss the centrality of the theme of motherhood to THE FARM.

As you pointed out, almost every character in THE FARM is a mother, a surrogate mother, or someone desperate to become a mother. I was interested in exploring the lengths that mothers will go to give their children better lives. This holds true for the immigrant women in the book, who make huge sacrifices daily for their family—and often earn a living by taking care of other (wealthy) people’s kids. But this also holds true for the privileged women in the book. If you asked any of these mothers why they do what they do—why they chose to be clients of The Farm, why they left their sons and daughters back home in the Philippines—they’d answer that they did it for their kids. What compels them—a visceral love for their babies—is in its most basic sense the same, regardless of race, or class, or socio-economic status.

So, what makes the mothers in THE FARM so different from each other? Why do we disdain some and feel an affinity for others? Is it because of their race? Their class? Is it because of the power imbalance among them? Do we care that some mothers in the book can ensure that their kids have an edge starting in utero? Does it bother us that, regardless of how hard some of the mothers in the book work, their children’s lives will be defined more by the neighborhoods they were born in and the education-level of their parents than anything else?

Read the interview >

She Roars podcast with Margaret Koval

I returned to my alma mater, Princeton University, in April on a gorgeous spring day to tape the She Roars podcast with Margaret Koval. We had a great conversation about The Farm, motherhood, capitalism, and how we see–and fail to see–the people around us. You can hear it here:

https://www.princeton.edu/news/2019/05/17/she-roars-podcast-talks-debut-novelist-joanne-ramos-about-trade-offs-motherhood

BBC4 Woman’s Hour Interview

What a treat to speak with Jane Garvey on BBC4’s fantastic program, Woman’s Hour, about The Farm. You can hear our conversation here:

Jo Whiley BBC Interview

I was thrilled to hear that The Farm was chosen for the BBC2/Jo Whiley Book Club in the UK! When I was in London the week of May 13th, I got to chat with Jo–and the lovely members of a book club out of Kent–about the The Farm. You can hear the program here:

Bookish Interview

Capitalism, Motherhood, and the American Dream: An Interview with The Farm’s Joanne Ramos

Earlier this year, we named Joanne Ramos’ novel The Farm one of the season’s must-read new releases. In it, readers travel to a farm in the Hudson Valley called Golden Oaks. It is there that women who work as surrogates live in a plush but carefully controlled environment for the duration of their pregnancies. Ramos chatted with Bookish about her book’s complicated relationship with capitalism, motherhood, and the American dream.

Read the interview >

Debutiful Interview

Joanne Ramos takes readers to ‘The Farm’ – an unintentional dystopian novel with relevant themes

When The Farm first landed at my doorstep, I was easily intrigued by what Joanne Ramos pieced together. From pregnancy rights to immigration, her novel – tinged with dystopian undertones – felt urgent as political nominees began to announce their candidacy for 2020.

Even though I expected to love it, the novel knocked me out. In her debut, which isn’t about politics, but about human rights on a larger scale, Ramos created a must read page-turner that offered readers an insight to what is happening now as well as what can happen in the future.

Nestled in Upstate New York, the titular farm, is where women in need of money can go to carry babies for the wealthy. The plot follows an immigrant from the Philippines in search for a more secure future.

Read interview >

The Rumpus Interview

THE LUXURY OF CHOICE: TALKING WITH JOANNE RAMOS

Joanne Ramos and I first met in a Ditmas writing workshop led by Rachel Sherman six years ago. There, Ramos shared the initial chapters of a novel, and her enormous talent clobbered me. The chapters introduced a Big Brother surrogacy farm, her vibrant characters, explored power dynamics, and beautifully rendered stories of Filipina caregivers. There’s one scene set in a swank Manhattan apartment (I won’t spoil it) that still has me holding my breath. After class, we became friends, swapping pages and commiserations as she tunneled deeper into the textured unfolding and unsettling landscape of The Farm.

Ramos worked in investment banking and private equity for many years, eventually transitioning into a staff writer role with The Economist. The path to publication for The Farm, Ramos’s first novel, has been a whirlwind fairytale, the kind writers dream about.

In February, I caught up with Ramos at her favorite coffee shop in Tribeca to talk about writing The Farm, her writing process, and pre-publication jitters.

Read the interview >

Good Housekeeping Interview

The Farm, a gripping novel centered on a secretive retreat where poor women incubate the perfect babies of über-wealthy clients in exchange for life-changing fees, evolved from author Joanne Ramos’s own experiences. Raised in a tight-knit Filipino community in Wisconsin, she was shocked by the wealth she encountered at Princeton. After graduation, she began a high-paying career in finance, which moved her to the other side of the wealth divide. When she left her job to raise her kids, she found she felt more kin- ship with the Filipina nannies and housekeepers she met on play- dates than with her former coworkers. The women talked of leaving families behind, sleeping a dozen to a room in illegal dorms and hoping that someday their work would pay off for their children back home. “It was heartbreaking,” Joanne tells GH. “They viewed me as the American dream, but I felt guilty about their pride in me. Some people will never be able to change their lives, no matter how hard they work.”

She created the story of Jane, a jobless Filipina immigrant who is at first thrilled to be chosen to “host” a pregnancy, though she must leave her own baby with her cousin until she delivers. But as Jane’s bright new world tightens chillingly around her,  she  begins  to fear the choice she’s made. “I wanted this to feel like something that could happen now,” says Joanne. As she tells it, the possibility may be more real than we think.

Joanne Ramos, author of THE FARM

BookPage Interview

A tale of surrogacy set in a world “pushed forward just a few inches”

Joanne Ramos’ debut novel, The Farm, has a provocative premise: A posh resort in New York’s Hudson Valley offers fine meals and handsome remuneration to women, most of them financially struggling immigrants, willing to live in seclusion from their families and carry a baby to term for wealthy clients. We spoke with Ramos about her work.

Dystopian fiction is a genre that other authors have used to shine a light on the treatment of women. The Handmaid’s Tale is perhaps the most famous example. Did you have previous books in mind that deal with similar topics as you wrote The Farm? And, in general, who are some of your literary influences? 

It’s funny: The Farm has been called dystopian by many reviewers and readers, and yet, I didn’t set out to write dystopian fiction. I’m someone who grew up straddling worlds—as a Filipina immigrant to Wisconsin in the late 1970s, as a financial-aid kid at Princeton University, as a woman in the male-dominated world of high finance and as a mother with conflicted feelings about my generation’s zeal to give our children the “best” of everything. I’ve often felt like an outsider in my life—an uncomfortable place to inhabit, sometimes, but outsider-hood does give one a certain distance and perspective. It was this perspective that I wanted to write about in my book. My obsessions sprung from this perspective.

The world of The Farm is meant to be our world pushed forward just a few inches—far enough so that the reader can get a bit of distance from our current state, but not so far afield that she can dismiss it as “sci-fi” or highly improbable. Is that dystopian? I suppose it depends on your definition of dystopia.

Read interview >

The Farm Book Launch at The Strand, New York City, May 2019

I introduced The Farm to the world on May 8th at one of my favorite bookstores, The Strand, at a sold-out event packed by old and new friends. You can see my talk with the author and frequent host of The Moth, Tara Clancy, here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0bQPjnOu4TM

Electric Literature

“The Farm” Explores Surrogacy as a Luxury Commodity for the Global Elite

Joanne Ramos on outsourcing the labor of pregnancy and the female body as manufacturing belt.

Picture this: an existence punctuated by yoga classes and country walks, sustained on a quinoa-heavy diet, swaddled in Merino wool. That’s the schedule of the women making possible this promise: the compromise of career or family resolved, without compromise. This is Golden Oaks, known as the Farm, a surrogacy facility that allows the global elite to outsource the labor of pregnancy to surrogates.

The setting of Joanne Ramos’s debut novel, The Farm, sounds like a thought experiment, but it’s better understood as a projection of the current inequalities. In a world of ubiquitous Louis Vuitton, the most conspicuous form of wealth, the truest status symbol, is the ability to buy back time. In Ramos’s novel, gestational surrogacy, a situation where a woman carries a baby that isn’t biologically related to her for compensation, is the ultimate luxury good. For those employed as surrogates, it’s a windfall. It’s a shot at the longest shot: the American dream. It’s also a sinister reversal of the idea of invisible labor—the labor of housework and childrearing that mostly exists below the drag net of economic measurements. That work here is given its due, a dollar value. But surrogacy as work turns its women into more than a labor force—the women become units of capital. It’s the body as manufacturing belt.

Read the interview >

BookPage interview by Michael Magras

A tale of surrogacy set in a world “pushed forward just a few inches”

Joanne Ramos’ debut novel, The Farm, has a provocative premise: A posh resort in New York’s Hudson Valley offers fine meals and handsome remuneration to women, most of them financially struggling immigrants, willing to live in seclusion from their families and carry a baby to term for wealthy clients. We spoke with Ramos about her work.

Dystopian fiction is a genre that other authors have used to shine a light on the treatment of women. The Handmaid’s Taleis perhaps the most famous example. Did you have previous books in mind that deal with similar topics as you wrote The Farm? And, in general, who are some of your literary influences? 

It’s funny: The Farm has been called dystopian by many reviewers and readers, and yet, I didn’t set out to write dystopian fiction. I’m someone who grew up straddling worlds—as a Filipina immigrant to Wisconsin in the late 1970s, as a financial-aid kid at Princeton University, as a woman in the male-dominated world of high finance and as a mother with conflicted feelings about my generation’s zeal to give our children the “best” of everything. I’ve often felt like an outsider in my life—an uncomfortable place to inhabit, sometimes, but outsider-hood does give one a certain distance and perspective. It was this perspective that I wanted to write about in my book. My obsessions sprung from this perspective.

Read the full article

Interview & Review in Book Nation by Jen

How much would you sacrifice to achieve the American Dream?

Interview and Review of The Farm and Q & A with Joanne Ramos

What could be better than living on sprawling beautiful property in the country, healthy food being served to you, fresh air and exercise, massages and pampering, and a generous, life changing paycheck, while all your needs are being met?  The catch…you must stay on the premises and be separated from your family and friends for nine months while you are pregnant with a baby that doesn’t belong to you.

In this stunning debut novel, The Farm, female-centric and slightly dystopian (will be appealing to fans of  The Handmaid’s Tale), author Joanne Ramos creates Golden Oaks, a secluded, country club atmosphere in Hudson Valley, NY where mostly foreign women are bearing children for elite clients who are not able to get pregnant or who choose not to.

Jane, a young, single Filipina mom with an infant, no husband and no secure place to live, decides to leave her own baby with her cousin, Ate, and take a job at Golden Oaks, where she will make enough money to better her life. She is chosen to be a Host, living in a luxury house in the middle of the countryside where her only job is to rest and keep the baby inside her healthy.  Nine months is a long time to be separated from your family and as time goes on, Jane starts to question the value of that big paycheck versus her sacrifices associated with being away. She is worried about her young daughter and her cousin, and is unsure the money alone is an adequate tradeoff for the painful separation and the missing of milestones.

Read the full article

Q: How did you come up with the idea for a novel centered on a surrogacy farm and do you know anyone that ever worked at one?

A.  When I finally dared to commit to writing a book, a childhood dream I’d deferred for decades, I was already forty. Certain ideas had obsessed me for much of my life but finding a way into them—finding the right story to contain them and, also, allow them room to breathe—was difficult. I spent well over a year writing short stories, flash-fiction pieces and “first chapters” of stillborn novels. It was an exercise in persistence and, also, faith. Then one day, when reading my husband’s Wall Street Journal, I happened upon a snippet of an article about a surrogacy facility in India. The what ifs began swirling in my mind almost immediately, and The Farm began to take shape.  

Read the full article

Girls Write Now Agent of Change Award Keynote, March 2019

I was honored to receive an Agent of Change award in March 2019 from Girls Write Now, a fantastic organization that pairs underserved female students in New York City with mentors and helps them find their voices through the power of writing and community. 90% of the girls in the Girls Write Now program are people of color, 70% are immigrants or first generation, and 90% are high need.

In my keynote address, I spoke to these young women about how publishing The Farm has been a dream come true–but one long deferred due to the stories I told myself.

VIDEO: Joanne Ramos at PRH

Joanne Ramos, author of THE FARM, at the Penguin Random House Open Book Event, December 2018.